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Northwest Spain issued 'red alert' as Storm Domingos roars towards coast

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The Local ([email protected])
Northwest Spain issued 'red alert' as Storm Domingos roars towards coast
Huge waves and strong winds are set to hit northwestern Spain on Saturday as Storm Domingos makes landfall. (Photo by Josep LAGO / AFP)

Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria have all been issued 'red alerts' as Storm Domingos is expected to make landfall in Spain on Saturday afternoon. Strong winds and storm surges pose a risk to residents of these areas.

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After the battering of Storm Ciaran, which left at least one woman dead after being struck by a tree in Madrid, Spain now faces renewed threat. 

Storm Domingos, given its name by the Spanish meteorological agency, is set to hit the country on Saturday afternoon with Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria in the northwest of the country set to be most affected. 

The worst of the storm will be felt on Saturday according to Rubén del Campo, said spokesperson for the national meteorological agency.

He told El País that there would be "very strong gusts of wind in the north, centre and east of the Peninsula and in the Balearic Islands, especially in coastal and mountainous areas, where they can exceed 100 km/h."

Residents in the northwest of Spain are advised to avoid going the coast, where waves will reach up to 11 metres in the northwest. Del Campo also urged people in these areas to avoid passing under objects that could collapse, like cranes, scaffolding and trees. 

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The storm will begin subside on Sunday, moving towards the North Sea. Next week Spain can expect more stable weather conditions. 

READ MORE: Storm Ciarán's 150km/h winds cause havoc across Spain

During the week Storm Ciaran broke a number of wind speed records in various parts of Spain including Almería and Segovia. It also fanned wildfires in the Valencia region. Scientists say that climate change is likely to exacerbate extreme weather events in the future. Warmer air holds more moisture meaning that the rainfall generated during storms is likely to get heavier as global warming continues.  

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