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Descendants of Spanish dictator Franco to sell off family jewels at London auction

Jewellery items once belonging to the wife of Spanish dictator General Francisco Franco are being offered for sale at London auction house Christies.

Descendants of Spanish dictator Franco to sell off family jewels at London auction
All photos from Christie's Catalogue "Important Jewels" Sale November 27th. PHOTOS: CHRISTIE'S IMAGES LTD. 2019

Jewellery once belonging to the wife of Spanish dictator General Francisco Franco are being offered for sale at London auction house Christie's.

An exquisite Art Déco diamond and emerald pendant necklace, matching drop earrings and a 19 carat marquise cut diamond ring all appear in the catalogue for a November 27th sale entitled “Important Jewels”.

The catalogue only lists the lots as belonging to “An Important Spanish Family” without identifying them further, but they are known to have belonged to the dictator’s wife Carmen Polo before being passed to their daughter, and only offspring, Carmen.

 

Carmen Franco, who died in 2017, was pictured wearing the diamond and emerald necklace to the wedding of the King’s elder sister Elena to Jaime de Marichalar in 1995 (Pictured below in Hola magazine).

The necklace last appeared adorning Margarita Vargas, the wife of Franco’s grandson Luis Alfonso de Burbon at a gala awards ceremony in 2016.

The items are expected to fetch between €300,000 and €400,000.

The sale has reignited a national debate over whether the descendants of Franco, who is said to have been responsible for the deaths of 300,000 people during the civil war and ensuing dictatorship, should be allowed to continue enjoying the spoils of his regime.

The Franco family legacy is a matter of controversy in Spain. With an estimated value of over €100 million, according to El Pais, assets belonging to the dictator’s grandchildren include a palace, 22 homes, 29 country estates, as well as five commercial premises and 195 garage spaces.

These include the Pazo de Meirás which was used by the dictator as a summer retreat in Galicia after it was ‘gifted’ to him by the people of A Coruña. In reality it was expropriated by the state and the families of those evicted are still fighting for compensation.

On Wednesday, the Association for the Recovery of Historical Memory (ARMH) demanded that the Spanish government look into the sale and determine whether the items could  be considered “plundered assets” and therefore returned to the people of Spain.

“The sale is worth investigating considering the dubious origin of his fortune and that was built on corruption , pillage and misappropriation,” said a spokesman from the ARHM, a group that campaigns for justice for the victims of the Franco and has led the struggle to find, exhume and identify those still lying in unmarked graves across Spain. 

“The Franco family fortune was built on the suffering of millions of people, the looting of thousands of properties, and the emptying of the National Heritage, initiated by the Generalissimo Foundation as soon as the war ended, in 1939.”

“Is it right that the family of a brutal dictator be allowed to profit from such a heritage?” they ask. 

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HISTORY

Why Spain is still in the wrong time zone because of Hitler

As Spain again prepares to put the clocks forward on Saturday night, we look at the fascinating reasons why the country has been in the wrong time zone for the last 75 years, the possible effects of this historical blip on Spanish society, and why there's still no sign of it changing.

Nazi leader German Chancellor Adolf Hitler (R) shakes hands with Spanish Generalísimo Francisco Franco at Hendaye train station on the French-Spanish border in October 1940. (Photo by AFP)
Nazi leader German Chancellor Adolf Hitler (R) shakes hands with Spanish Generalísimo Francisco Franco at Hendaye train station on the French-Spanish border in October 1940. (Photo by AFP)

Why is Spain in the wrong time zone?

Madrid lies directly south of London. Spain is geographically in line with the UK and Portugal. It makes sense, then, that Spain was in the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) zone until around 75 years ago.

But that all changed in 1940. With Nazi Germany occupying Belgium, Holland, and recently invading France, Spain’s own facist dictator, Francisco Franco, travelled to the French border to meet with Hitler, the man he and many other believed would go on to dominate Europe.

The momentum was clearly with the Nazis, at the time, and Italy had already pledged its support to Hitler. Although he wanted the same from Spain, Franco, however, didn’t have much to offer. With the country ravaged by its own recent Civil War – in which Franco’s victory was heavily supported by Hitler –  Franco felt obliged to make a gesture of some sort.

Although ultimately remaining neutral in the war, Franco decided to show his support for Hitler by agreeing to put Spain’s clocks forward by an hour in an act of solidarity with Nazi Germany. 

Spain has remained in the Central European Time zone ever since, in line with countries as far east as Poland. That means that Madrid currently has the same time as Warsaw in Poland 2,290km away but is one hour ahead of Lisbon which is only 502 km away. 

The consequences of Spain being in the wrong time zone

But Franco’s decision all those years ago isn’t just a quirk of Spanish history, or testament to the extent to which the legacy of that period still looms over Spanish society, it was a decision that, experts say, has had a lasting impact on Spanish culture and society that underpins everything from Spaniard’s sleep cycles and meal times to the country’s birth rates and economic growth.

In recent years there have been calls to make the switch back to GMT because many believe the time zone quirk is affecting Spaniard’s productivity and quality of life. In 2013 a Spanish national commission concluded that Spaniards sleep almost an hour less than the European average, and that this led to increased stress, concentration problems, both at school and work, and workplace accidents.

Some experts believe this explains the Spanish dependence on siestas – that is, that the lack of sleep makes them necessary – but in reality the siesta has been a consistent feature of Spanish life for centuries for many of the same reasons it still is today: in southern Spain, the fierce summer temperatures make it necessary to stay at home during the afternoon. 

Spain's most famous clock is the Puerta del Sol in central Madrid. Photo: Jorge Franganillo/Flickr
Spain’s most famous clock is at the Puerta del Sol in central Madrid. Photo: Jorge Franganillo/Flickr

One effect of the siesta however is that the break in the day means Spaniards work the most hours in Europe yet at one of the continent’s lowest levels of productivity. A lack of sleep contributes to siesta taking which, in turn, means Spaniards work later into the evening and could partly explain Spain’s notoriously nocturnal lifestyles and late meal times. 

Despite the country running on CET, Spaniards’ eating patterns roughly mirror GMT. Many Spaniards eat lunch at what would be 1 or 1.30pm in London (the traditional 2 or 2.30pm in Spain) and dinner at a reasonable 8pm in London (but 9pm or even 10pm as is customary in many parts of Spain).

Making the change and returning to GMT would, according to Nuria Chinchilla, professor at Spain’s IESE business school, help Spaniards “return to the natural order of our circadian rhythm (our 24-hour physiological cycle) that goes with the sun… and the sun in Greenwich, not Germany”.

“If we don’t (change to GMT) we lengthen the day, eat very late and then don’t sleep,” she added.

Why hasn’t Spain moved to the right time zone yet?

The debate about which time zone Spain belongs in was reinvigorated following recent proposals at the EU level to scrap entirely the daylight savings custom. 

In 2018 the EU Commission announced a proposal to abolish the custom after polling showed that 80 percent of Europeans are in favour of staying permanently on summer time.This debate naturally had many in Spain wondering about whether they were in the right time zone.

But owing to a combination of the COVID-19 pandemic, Brexit, and various other bureaucratic difficulties, the proposal was shelved. Member states cannot decide unilaterally on the question of daylight savings, but they can decide which timezone they want to be in. 

Spain has had various commissions over the years exploring the impact of daylight savings and timezones, but no concrete proposals over a return to GMT have ever been made, despite the benefits experts claim it could bring.

Although the government’s focus has been drawn by more pressing issues in recent years – and the issue of time and daylight savings shelved at the European level – expect discussion of whether Spain is actually even in the right time zone this weekend when the clocks do go back, or if the linked issue of daylight savings is eventually taken off the shelf at the European level.

Article by Conor Faulkner

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