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93 percent of this MBA’s graduates have doubled their salary

If you're working overseas in the corporate world, odds are that past a certain point, you'll find it difficult to progress without an MBA.

93 percent of this MBA's graduates have doubled their salary
Looking for the MBA that nine out of ten graduates would recommend to their peers? Consider HEC Paris. Photo: Supplied

This can seem an overwhelming prospect – there’s a bewildering variety of MBA courses vying for your attention. Furthermore, when and if you decide on a program, they uniformly involve a significant investment – they can cost anywhere between $60-160,000 USD, and that’s before you factor in the time and energy involved for an on-average two year programme. 

You may ask, is such an undertaking really worth it? 

Together with the leading French business school, HEC Paris, we examine the benefits completing an MBA can provide, and discuss whether it may be the right choice for you. 

A popular choice

Whether you are an employer or an employee, MBAs are popular in the corporate world. In April, a survey by the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) showed that 9 out of 10 MBA graduates recommend the qualification to others, citing the motivation it provides, the career flexibility and the ensuing job prospects as benefits. 

Employers are also big fans of MBA graduates. This year, a survey of international employers by the Association of MBAs (AMBA) revealed their attitudes towards graduates. 47 percent of surveyed employers considered themselves ‘Very Favourable’ towards MBA graduates, with another 40% considering themselves as ‘Favourable’.

Further examination of the AMBA survey reveals what exactly employers value about MBA graduates. Qualities identified in graduates, and rated most highly by employers included understanding of management principles, leadership and problem-solving skills. Time-management skills and ability with multiple languages were also considered skills that MBA graduates excelled in – especially those participating in an international programme. 

Going by this data, completing an MBA seems to be a ‘no brainer for those seeking fast career progression. The time, money and energy required to complete the qualification seem a welcome trade for the upskilling provided, and the favorability it has among employers. 

Looking for an MBA program that offers high quality teaching and a global outlook on business? Find out more about what HEC Paris offers

On the move: Undertaking an MBA can open up a world of career opportunities. Photo: Getty Images

Case Study: HEC Paris

For a better idea of how an MBA can benefit those seeking to move their career forward, let us examine one particular cohort from one program – in this case, the graduating class of 2021 from HEC Paris

First, we should identify some important information about the class. 281 participants from 50 different countries made up the 2021 cohort. 34 percent of graduates were female, and 66 percent male. Almost half of the 2021 class hailed from the Asia and Oceania regions, followed by the Americas, Europe and finally, Africa. The average years of work experience prior to embarking on the MBA was six years. The course length for an HEC MBA is 16 months – as opposed to the usual 24. 

Three months after graduating, 93% of the HEC Paris 2021 cohort had accepted a job offer. On average, in accepting those job offers these graduates almost doubled their pre-MBA salaries.

Some of the top recruiters for the 2021 cohort included Amazon, Hello Fresh, Microsoft and Deloitte – all thriving companies with an international reach.  

Of course, a higher salary isn’t everything. Job satisfaction and flexibility also play an important role for many. 79 percent of HEC graduates changed their job sector following graduation and 67 percent changed their role, demonstrating the opportunities provided by the qualification – students were able to find a role that better suited their interests and passions. 

An MBA also led to greater mobility for HEC Paris graduates. 68 percent of the cohort secured a job outside of their home country, beginning an international career and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for many.

93% of 2021 HEC Paris MBA graduates received a new job offer within three months of graduation – find out what set them apart from their peers

Strong connections: HEC Paris students can access an alumni network stretching across both industries and the globe. 

The sensible decision

For those wishing to progress their career, undertaking an MBA would appear to be the smart choice across a number of important metrics. 

Whether it’s an increased salary, greater career flexibility or international mobility, the data demonstrates that the 2021 graduating class of HEC Paris have enjoyed all three. 

Of course, not all MBAs are the same, and many have a particular focus, whether it be industry-specific or more focused on leadership skills. It is important to do your research before making any decision and to talk to alumni to get a better understanding of what you’re about to take on.  

For an MBA program with an international focus and a global reputation for quality teaching, you may like to consider HEC Paris. Based near an international centre of culture and commerce, students enjoy world-class teaching across sixteen months of industry experience, and are able to access a strong alumni network. The school also offers flexibility in terms of learning, with a number of delivery options to suit your schedule. One of Europe’s top three business schools, HEC Paris demonstrates excellence in MBA education. 

Choosing to undertake an MBA is not a decision to be taken lightly – but as we’ve seen, the positives can more than make up for the costs, financial or otherwise. 

Enrol in the HEC Paris MBA that unlocks significant career progression, increased salaries and international mobility for its graduates 

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TRAVEL

UPDATE: Is it possible to drive between Spain and the UK via France?

Travelling between Spain and the UK during the pandemic has been very difficult due to border closures, cancelled flights and quarantines, but what is the situation like now? Is it possible to drive between Spain and the UK via France?

Driving between Spain and UK
Photo: Bertsz / 67 images/ Pixabay

Several readers have asked about the restrictions and necessary documents and tests needed to drive to the UK and if it’s possible. Here’s what you need to know.

Travelling by car between the UK and Spain at the moment is possible, but not very easy. Although it’s a lot easier now than it was before the state of alarm ended, it will still involve PCR and/or antigen testing, quarantine, and lots of form-filling. This will mean extra expenses too. 

Spain and France have both updated their rules on travel as restrictions begin to ease. Here’s a look at what you need to know driving between the UK and Spain, via France right now.

Leaving Spain

Movement in Spain has become a lot easier since the end of the state of alarm on May 9th. This means that you can easily drive across regional borders without the need to prove specific reasons.

There may still be certain municipalities or health zones that you might need to avoid because their borders are still closed due to a high number of cases, but for the most part, your drive through Spain, up until the French border, will be easy.

Keep in mind that some regions still have certain restrictions in place such as when bars and restaurants are allowed to open and a few still maintain curfews, so you’ll need to check the rules of those regions you’re planning on driving through.

READ ALSO: UPDATED: What are the post state of alarm restrictions in each region in Spain?

Crossing the French border from Spain

Travel into France is allowed for any reason, including for tourism and family visits. This easing of restrictions was introduced on May 3rd, which saw France opening up both its regional and international borders.

According to the French embassy in Spain: “Entry into the metropolitan territory from a country in the European area is subject to the presentation, by travellers over eleven years of age, of a negative result of a PCR test, carried out within 72 hours prior to departure. This obligation applies to all modes of travel (arrival by road, rail, air or sea)”.

They also state that all travellers will have to present an affidavit/certificate of international travel, certifying that they do not have symptoms of Covid-19 infection and that they are not aware of having been in contact with a confirmed case of Covid-19 in the fourteen days prior to the trip.

“If you are over eleven years old, you agree that a biological test for SARS-CoV-2 will be carried out upon arrival on French territory” it continues.

The certificate can be downloaded from the website of the French Ministry. The supporting documents must be presented to the control authorities at the border.

The test must be carried out within 72 hours of departing for France and the antigen test is not accepted. You must take a PCR test, otherwise, you’ll be refused entry to France.

A Spanish police officer checks PCR coronavirus tests at the border between Spain and France. Photo: RAYMOND ROIG / AFP

You can drive straight through France, as there’s no quarantine requirement for those coming from inside the EU.

Note that France still has several restrictions in place, but they are gradually easing. As of May 19th, the curfew was extended to 9pm and bars and restaurants were allowed to operate outdoor services only. This means that you’ll need to stop driving and find somewhere to spend the night after the 9pm cut-off time.

If you have to travel past curfew for an essential reason, you will need an attestation permission form, which you can find HERE.

From June 9th, the curfew will be extended again until 11pm and the interiors of bars and restaurants will be allowed to re-open. 

Masks are compulsory in all indoor public spaces across the country, and also outdoors in most of the larger towns and cities. If you don’t wear one, you could face a fine of €135.

Entering the UK

On May 17th, the UK government lifted its ban on all non-essential travel abroad and replaced it with the traffic light system, assigning countries to red, amber or green lists, according to their health data.

France and Spain are currently on the amber list, as well as most other European countries, bar Portugal, which is on the green list.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: The European countries on England’s ‘amber’ travel list and what that means

This means that you must follow the amber list rules.

The UK government website states that if coming from an amber-list country, even if you’ve been vaccinated, you need to follow these rules before you enter England:

 On arrival in England you must:

  • quarantine at home or in the place you are staying for 10 days
  • take a COVID-19 test on or before day 2 and on or after day 8

Children aged 4 and under do not need to take the day 2 or day 8 test.

You may be able to end quarantine early if you pay for a private COVID-19 test through the Test to Release scheme.

The traffic light list only applies to England, but Scotland also has its own traffic-light system, which at the moment has the same green-list countries as England. It is thought that Wales and Northern Ireland are likely to adopt the traffic light system too.

If you’re entering the UK from an amber country, you can go for any reason. It doesn’t have to be an essential trip and entry is not limited to UK nationals or residents.

Find further information on UK travel rules HERE.

If in the future, France makes it onto the green list, then no quarantine will be necessary. Regardless, of this, a negative Covid-19 test is still needed to enter England, plus another test on or before day 2.

What about driving back to Spain?

The UK is still advising against travel to amber countries for leisure or tourism reasons, which France and Spain are both currently on.

This isn’t a travel ban, but the official stand can mean that your travel insurance won’t be valid, so check your policy before you travel.

JUNE UPDATE: From Monday, May 31st, France is tightening up entry requirements for arrivals from the UK, following in the footsteps of Germany and Austria as European countries become increasingly concerned about circulation of the ‘Indian variant’ of Covid in the UK.

So what’s the situation if you are just passing through?

If you are returning to your permanent residence in another EU or Schengen zone country then you can travel, as one of the listed ‘vital reasons’ is returning home. You will, however, need to show some proof of your residency, ideally a residency card.

If you are travelling for another reason you can travel through France, provided you spend less than 24 hours in the country.

The testing requirement applies to all arrivals, even if you are only passing through France, but if you spend less than 24 hours in the country you are not required to quarantine.

You will also need to check the rules in your destination country on arrivals from France. If you are entering France from an EU or Schengen zone country you will need to show a negative Covid test taken within the previous 72 hours and this must be a PCR test. You can enter France for any reason from an EU/Schengen country.

And yes, these rules all apply even to the fully vaccinated.

To find out more about the rules and exceptions for travel between France and the UK click the link below.

READ MORE: Spain-UK road travel – Can I transit through France despite the new Indian variant restrictions?

Currently, the Spanish government website states that only citizens and legal residents of the European Union, Schengen states, Andorra, Monaco, The Vatican and San Marino, as well as those who can demonstrate through documentary evidence an essential need to enter Spain, will be able to enter the country.

However, Spain recently announced that it would welcome British tourists into the country without a negative PCR test from May 24th. 

READ ALSO:

The website also states that “all overland travellers (excluding children under the age of 6 years old) who wish to enter Spain by road from France, are required to present a negative PCR or antigen test taken within 72 hours prior to entry”.

This applies to everyone, even if you have been vaccinated already.

Please note The Local is not able to give advice on individual cases. For more information on international travel to and from Spain, see the government’s website and check the restrictions in your destination country with the appropriate embassy.

READ ALSO: Reader question: Can I fly from the UK to Spain to visit family or my second home?

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