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Spain’s Majorca to limit cruise ship arrivals from 2022

Balearic authorities will from 2022 limit the number of cruise ships which can dock in the port of Palma de Mallorca, a first for the popular holiday destination.

Tourists of the cruise ship 'Mein Schiff 2' of the German travel giant TUI visit Palma de Mallorca, on June 17, 2021.
Tourists of the cruise ship 'Mein Schiff 2' of the German travel giant TUI visit Palma de Mallorca, on June 17th, 2021.

A maximum of 518 cruise ships will be allowed to stop in the Mediterranean port next year, compared to the 594 that docked there in 2019 before the pandemic, the archipelago’s regional government said late Monday in a statement.

No more than three cruise ships will be allowed to dock on the same day, and only one of them can be a so-called “mega-cruise” ship with a capacity of over 5,000 passengers, it added.

Set to hold for five years, the new rules were agreed over two years of talks with the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA), an industry group that represents 95 percent of global ocean-going cruise capacity.

“It is the first time that a real limit is set on the arrival of cruise passengers in Palma,” regional tourism minister Iago Negueruela said.

Residents of Palma de Mallorca have long called for curbs on cruise ships, saying the sudden surges in tourist arrivals disrupt their lives and strain services from public transport to water.

Some locals say they avoid the city centre on days when many cruise ships dock, and before the pandemic graffiti flourished on walls of the city urging “Tourists go home”.

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TRAVEL NEWS

EasyJet pilots strike in Spain

EasyJet's Spanish pilots walked out on Friday, calling for the reinstatement of conditions they enjoyed before the coronavirus pandemic, two weeks after a strike by the low-cost carrier's cabin crew had resulted in a deal.

EasyJet pilots strike in Spain

Easyjet’s Spanish pilots walked out on Friday, calling for the reinstatement of conditions they enjoyed before the coronavirus pandemic, two weeks after a strike by the low-cost carrier’s cabin crew had resulted in a deal.

Coming at the height of the summer tourist season, the new Easyjet stoppages will add to the problems facing the sector.

Cabin crew at budget rival Ryanair have been staging 24-hour walkouts since June, which are likely to continue until January 2023, unions said.

The Easyjet pilots, for their part, are staging a first three-day strike from Friday at the airports of Barcelona, Malaga and the Mediterranean islands of Palma de Majorca and Minorca, the SEPLA union said.

Two more three-day walkouts are planned later in August.

“This is the only possible alternative for the pilots’ representatives, after more than six months of negotiations, at which the company has rejected all proposals made,” the union said.

The airline cancelled eight flights on Friday, most of them from Barcelona, Spain’s second-busiest airport.

“During the worst months of the pandemic, we agreed to lower our salaries to guarantee not only jobs, but the survival of the company itself in Spain,” the union said.

Now, however, the company “refuses to recover the working conditions. “We are not asking for anything that we did not have two years ago,” said a union spokesman.

In late July, EasyJet said it took a sizeable financial hit from sector-wide disruptions, notably staff shortages, but still slashed quarterly losses as demand recovered.

Just days later, EasyJet cabin crews ended their strike, after reaching a deal with management to raise wages by 22 percent over three years.

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