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Mobile-first MBAs? The top international executives making a radical choice

Studying for an MBA is a major commitment, especially if you're a busy professional. But a pioneering new business school is taking a radical approach to higher education; one that offers you financial savings, a new level of flexibility, and a global network in the palm of your hand. It has also proven to accelerate its students' career progress.

Mobile-first MBAs? The top international executives making a radical choice
Photo: Katja Smith

Quantic School of Business and Technology is the world’s first accredited mobile-first business school. Its MBA and Executive MBA (EMBA) allow students, most of whom continue working full-time during their studies, to learn from any device, anywhere, anytime.

It’s what attracts senior decision-makers such as Luciano Bottoni, of Capgemini Engineering, and high-level managers who are working parents like Katja Smith, of Google. 

Students like Luciano and Katja can access a global network of savvy decision-makers (both classmates and alumni), while an innovative tuition model has resulted in one in three having earned their degree for free. Luciano’s employer covered the cost of his tuition fees because it was the right investment for the company and for him. “I think the price is the right one,” he says.

Ready to learn and grow? Apply for the app-based MBA or Executive MBA program by 23 September

Goodbye passive learning

Many online educational tools rely on traditional lecture-based learning and video presentations by professors. If you feel this isn’t what you need to boost your career in the 2020s, you’re not alone. 

Interactive app-based learning with Quantic is different. You’ll be prompted to engage with the material about every eight seconds, plus you’ll get instant feedback to help you learn from any mistakes you make.

“You can’t just passively look at it because it will not go to the next page,” says Luciano, an Italian who works as a Business Division Director at Capgemini Engineering in Germany. Before the pandemic, he would take advantage of Quantic’s mobile-first platform to study on a train while commuting. “For my kind of life and work, it’s really perfect,” he says.


Katja Smith & Luciano Bottoni (Photos: Supplied)

Making top class connections

Whether you study the MBA or the Executive MBA (which includes advanced courses designed for mid-career professionals and entrepreneurs), your classmates for the next 13 months will come from every industry.

Many studied at top universities such as Harvard, Cambridge, and Oxford, and work for leading companies such as Apple, Amazon, and Google. More than 150 Google managers have enrolled in Quantic, including mother-of-two Katja, an industry manager based in Berlin.

Katja, part of the EMBA class of August 2021, says she’s been surprised to find so many of her Quantic peers on LinkedIn working at great companies. “I’m definitely going to make use of the network,” she adds.

The EMBA attracts many people working in STEM, social sciences, and the tech industry. You can easily connect with current students and alumni (across almost 150 countries) within the app through filtering searches by industry or interests.

The extensive network allows students to collaborate with faculty and classmates, attend exclusive conferences around the world, participate in in-person and virtual meet-ups, and gives students access to research advisors and résumé consultants. Some Quantic students have even gone on to start companies together. 

Can you see yourself as an innovator of the future? Enrol in the MBA or Executive MBA that you can complete anywhere, from your smartphone, by September 23

Cutting students’ costs 

Both Luciano and Katja say the EMBA is providing clear benefits for themselves and their employers. Luciano, an engineer who is now a senior executive, says it helps him with strategic decisions involving both economics and people. For Katja, the breadth of the EMBA has given her a “different perspective” on her employer’s business that goes far beyond her client-facing role.

So what about the cost? Tuition for both the MBA and the EMBA is just US$9,600 and Quantic is continuing to invest in more ways to lower costs to students, with a larger mission of democratizing elite higher education. This tuition innovation is thanks both to companies funding the costs for their employees, as well as a tuition model that sees students’ costs offset as companies pay to recruit from Quantic’s career network.

Have you got business dreams that you want to make a reality? Quantic is the smartphone MBA and Executive MBA that goes wherever you are

Watch the video below for more insights from Luciano and Katja

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EDUCATION

EXPLAINED: How Spain will make it easier for students to graduate

The Spanish government has passed a new decree which will allow secondary and sixth form students to graduate and receive their qualifications, even if they have failed some subjects.

Spain is changing its education rules
There will also be no re-sitting of exams at Spanish secondary schools. Photo: CESAR MANSO / AFP

The Spanish government approved on Tuesday, November 16th a new Royal Decree which gives instructions to teachers to change the way they grade their students for the rest of the school year of 2021/2022 and 2022/2023.

Education in Spain is compulsory for all those from ages 6 to 16. The Spanish education system is made up of primary and secondary schools. Secondary school is referred to as ESO and students receive a Título de Graduado Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (Title of Graduation from Obligatory Secondary School Education). This is the last four years of compulsory education, up until age 16, and is similar to GCSEs in the UK.

After age 16, Spanish students can go on to study for the optional Bachillerato for the next two years up until age 18. This is equivalent to A-levels in the UK and is needed if the student wants to attend university. 

The new rules apply to the ESO and Bachillerato qualifications. In primary education, there were no specific qualifications or failure limits and this is the same in the new decree too. 

What is changing?

  • Before, students studying for the ESO were allowed to pass each year only if they did not have more than three failed subjects, but now with the new decree, there is no limit.
  • There will also be no re-sitting of exams in ESO.
  • In order to graduate with the ESO qualification at age 16, students could still graduate even if they had up to two failed subjects, however now there is no limit in the number of failed subjects allowed to graduate. 
  • In order to pass each year of the Bachillerato, students could still move on if they had up to two failed subjects. This will stay the same in the new decree too. 
  • In order to graduate with the Bachillerato qualification before, students had to pass all subjects and exams, but now one failed subject is allowed. 
  • Students will also be able to sit the Selectividad, which are the Spanish university admission tests if they have failed some of their Bachillerato (sixth form) school subjects.
  • For the first time in history, students with special needs who have had significant curricular adaptations and have not studied the minimum requirement for other students will also be able to receive their high school qualifications.

READ ALSO: Why Spain is failing in maths and science teaching

How will it be decided if students can graduate?

The text presented to the Council of Ministers by Pilar Alegría, the Spanish Minister of Education states that the decision on whether or not a student passes secondary education will be decided on by each board of the school or institution at the end of the school year.

It is the teaching team “who is given the ultimate responsibility for the decision on the promotion and qualification of students” she stated. It will be the teachers who have to make the decision after assessing whether the student “has reached the appropriate degree of acquisition of the corresponding skills”. 

This means that there will no longer be specific requirements to graduate high school and that the parameters for passing will be different for each institution.   

Why have the rules changed?

The new measures are designed to avoid students repeating years and improve graduation statistics.

According to the latest statistics, out of the countries in the EU in 2020, 79 percent of the population between 25 and 64 years old had graduated Secondary Education or higher and Spain is around 16.1 points below this average. 

Pilar Alegría said that 30 percent of 15-year-old students have repeated a year at least once and “dropout rates are increased by this percentage of students”. 

That is why we are committed to a system “based on trust in teachers”, “continuous evaluation” and “collaborative work by teaching teams”. She has assured that “the culture of effort does not run any risk with this new norm. An effort based on motivation is better than one based on punishment”.  

READ ALSO: Spain passes contested education bill

Are all regions on board with the new rules?

Madrid, Andalusia, Galicia, Castilla y León and Murcia strongly oppose the new rules because they “lower the requirement” and “unsettle the teachers”. 

The five regions complain that the royal decree changes the rules of the game in the middle of the course since the students have started the academic year with a particular curriculum and specific criteria in order to pass it. 

Madrid 

“Within our powers, while respecting the law, we are going to try to prevent the royal decree from being applied, as we consider that it is a direct attack on one of the pillars of the Madrid educational system, as is the merit and the effort of the students “, said sources from the Department of Education of the Community of Madrid.

Galicia

The education authorities in Galicia said that they will also “explore any legal possibility that allows for preserving the culture of effort and quality as signs of identity”.

Castilla y León

The education departments in Castilla y León said that for their part, they “will make sure that the curricular development and the norms of promotion and qualification are the least harmful”.

Andalusia 

“Although the norm establishes that the Baccalaureate degree can be obtained with a failed subject, we understand that it does not make sense because all subjects contribute to the acquisition of the necessary competencies,” said the education authorities in Andalusia.

Murcia 

Murcia is also not in favor of the royal decree and denounces “the improvisation of the Pedro Sánchez government and the lack of legal security for the decisions that have been taken”.   

Unions and Associations

Teachers’ unions such as Csif or Anpe or associations such as Concapa or Cofapa warn that more students are going to arrive less prepared for the next level of education, where the problem will explode. 

These regions argue that this new system will leave a lot of grey areas because teachers’ criteria can be very subjective. The elimination of make-up exams is also causing confusion because “they give another opportunity for students to pass based on their effort and ability”. 

The rest of the regions, on the other hand, were in favor of eliminating the need to re-sit exams because they believe that the evaluation should be “continuous” and the student should not risk everything for a single exam.

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