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COVID-19

EU approves use of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in children 12 and over in Europe

The European Commission authorised the use of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in 12- to 15-year-olds on Friday, following the European Medicines Agency's approval of administering the jabs to adolescents earlier in the day.

EU approves use of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in children 12 and over in Europe
A nurse prepares a syringe with saline solution before it is diluted with the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at the Evonik vaccination in Hanau, western Germany (Photo by THOMAS LOHNES / AFP)

This vaccine is already approved for people aged 16 and over in the EU.

Earlier this month, US regulators authorised the vaccine for children in the 12-to-15 age group, and it is now widely available.

The European Medicines Agency said that two doses of the vaccine would be needed in adolescents and should be given at least three weeks apart, which is the same guidance as for adult use.

Individual EU states would be able to decide whether or not they wanted to offer the vaccine to the 12 to 15-year-olds.

READ ALSO: Vaccines to be made available to children 12 and over in Germany starting June

Germany said on Thursday that it would start giving the vaccine to children from 12 to 15 from June 7th, which is when vaccine prioritisation for all adults is set to end in Germany.

READ ALSO: Covid jabs for children in Germany will be an ‘individual decision’, says Health Minister

Italy has also said it would extend its vaccination campaign to the over-12s, with approval from Italy’s regulator expected by Monday.

READ ALSO: Italy to open Covid jab appointments to all over-16s from June 3rd

And Austrian capital Vienna was waiting for the EMA approval before opening up Covid-19 vaccination registrations to parents of 12- to 15-year-olds.

In Switzerland, meanwhile, children may be able to get vaccinated at the age of 10, even without their parents’ approval.

The EMA approval may help reassure parents when children go back to face-to-face teaching, but the issue is not without controversy.

A few figures in the medical community have said there is not yet enough evidence to support vaccines and their potential side effects in younger people, while others believe older and vulnerable people in less wealthy countries should be prioritised over children.

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COVID-19

Spanish PM tests positive for Covid

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez has announced that he has tested positive for COVID-19.

Spanish PM tests positive for Covid

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez said on Sunday that he had tested positive for Covid and temporarily suspended all engagements just two days after returning from the UN General Assembly meeting.

“This morning, I tested positive for Covid-19,” Sánchez tweeted, adding he would not be attending a meeting of the Catalan region’s Socialists in Barcelona.

Sánchez, who returned from New York on Friday, said he would continue working but take the utmost precautions. It is unclear if the Prime Minister is suffering symptoms, or feeling unwell.

On Friday, he is due to host a meeting in the southeastern city of Alicante of the MED7 group of southern European countries, and is expected to be on the road doing public events much more in the coming year as part of a ramp up to the general election sometime in late-2023.

The tour, reportedly including 30 events organised to increase Sánchez’s contact with Spaniards, is intended to allow him to better explain the measures taken by the government in response to the cost of living crisis, increase his public interaction, and leave behind the more traditional rally format.

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