How Spain’s tourist landmarks could become Covid vaccination centres

How Spain’s tourist landmarks could become Covid vaccination centres
Barcelona's Sagrada Familia is one of the sites chosen as a vaccination centre. Photo: AFP
Imagine queuing up to enter one of Spain’s most visited tourist sites, not to marvel at the grandeur or gaze at the sculptures but to receive a vaccine against Covid-19.

This is the plan put forward by Catalonia’s public health secretary who believes that situating mass vaccination centres inside landmarks could help encourage people to get the jab.

Dr Josep Argimon suggested that Barça’s Camp Nou and Gaudi’s Sagrada Família would make ideal vaccination centres during an interview with RadioCat broadcast on Tuesday.

Not only are they vast spaces with easy access and good ventilation, all prerequisites for vaccination centres, but they are emblematic places that would inspire people to come, he explained.

Catalan health authorities have yet to approve the plan and will seek permission for Camp Nou once the new president of Barcelona’s Football Club is elected in March.

Spain will launch Phase Two of its vaccination programme before completing Phase One after deciding that the Oxford developed Astra-Zeneca vaccine will only be given to those aged under-55.

This phase will see those workers considered essential but not on the frontline of Covid care, such as pharmacists and physiotherapists, under the age threshold given the Astra-Zeneca vaccine.

Elderly in residential care homes, those that care for them, and frontline health workers all fall in the Phase One priority group and Spain has already administered 1.87 million doses produced by Pfizer and Moderna.

Spain has a target of vaccinating 70 percent of its population by summer.

Nearly three quarters of Spaniards are willing to receive a shot as soon as one became available, according to a poll by the Centre for Sociological Studies (CIS).

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