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SEMANA SANTA

Ten mouthwatering dishes to enjoy at Easter in Spain

After diligently avoiding sweets and other tasty temptations for Lent, Catholic Spaniards know how to ring in the end of the religious season with amazing dishes during Holy Week.

Ten mouthwatering dishes to enjoy at Easter in Spain
Easter in Spain is about so much more than chocolate eggs. Photo: Manuel / Flickr

From a Spanish version of French toast to a Catalan Easter cake, we count down Spaniards’ favourite Easter foods. 

Torrijas

This scrumptious treat is very traditional for Easter, with recipes dating back to the 1600s. Thick pieces of bread are soaked in a mixture of milk and egg, then fried with olive oil and served with honey and sugar.


Photo: Eduardo/Wikipedia Commons

RECIPE: Recipe: How to make Spain’s delicious Easter dish Torrijas

Pestiños

Also popular for Christmas time, pestiños are commonly made in southern Spain by deep-frying a piece of dough – often flavoured with sesame – in olive oil and then glazing it with honey or sugar.

Photo: Ismael Olea/Wikipedia Commons

Hornazo

This meat pie that hails from Salamanca and Ávila is often filled with pork loin, chorizo and hard-boiled eggs. There is also a sweet version with almonds, sugar and eggs.

Photo: Tamorlan/Wikipedia Commons

Mona de Pascua

Especially popular in Catalonia and Valencia, this cake is traditionally given to children as a gift. Cakes are topped with either boiled eggs, or chocolate ones, as well as colourful decorations.

Photo: Pablo Rodríguez / Flickr

Flores de Semana Santa

 Also known as flores manchegas, these sweet and fried pastries come in delightful shapes.

Photo: Manuel / Flickr

Potaje de Vigilia.

Traditionally served on Good Friday before Easter Sunday, this ‘vigil stew’ is made of cod, chickpeas, spinach and garlic.

Photo: Tamorlan/Wikipedia Commons.

Buñuelos

Basically a fried doughnut, this treat is made with simple ingredients of water, milk, egg or yeast and can be sweet or savoury.

Photo: Baptiste Pons/Wikipedia Commons

Leche Frita

Literally “fried milk”, this sweet is typical in northern Spain, made by cooking flour with milk and sugar until it becomes firm. It is then topped off with cinnamon and a sugar glaze.

Photo: Tirithel/Wikipedia Commons

Bartolillos.

Traditionally served in Madrid, bartolillos are dumplings of thin dough, fried with a custard filling.

Photo: Tamorlan/Wikipedia Commons.

Sopa de Ajo

This soup, often made of garlic, chicken broth, egg and sherry, is a traditional dish to serve during Semana Santa.

Photo: G M/Wikipedia Commons

READ MORE: The essential guide to Easter in Spain

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LIFE IN SPAIN

EXPLAINED: What should I do if I lose my wallet in Spain?

It can happen to the best of us, but what should you do if you lose or have your wallet/purse stolen in Spain?

EXPLAINED: What should I do if I lose my wallet in Spain?

Whether you’re visiting Spain or live here, losing your wallet or purse can create a huge amount of stress, not to mention the potentially laborious bureaucratic processes you have to go through in order to sort everything out.

Anyone can drop or misplace their wallet, and although Spain is a safe country, like any big city in the world pickpockets do operate. This is particularly true in the more touristy areas of Barcelona.

READ MORE: How Barcelona is once again Spain’s pickpocket capital

Hopefully it never happens to you, but what should you do if you lose your wallet in Spain? 

  1. Search – This one almost goes without saying, but be sure to retrace your steps, search thoroughly at home, and in bags, pairs of trousers etc before reporting the loss of theft. If you start the denuncia process (more on that later) and then find your wallet or purse, you’ll have wasted a lot of time and energy navigating the quirks of the Spanish bureaucratic system. Many cities in Spain have a lost and found office (oficina de objetos perdidos) which you should also consider visiting before getting in touch with police authorities. There are plenty of honest people in Spain, so fingers crossed the person who finds it will hand it in.
  2. Cancel your bank cards – If you’re certain you haven’t just misplaced it, consider cancelling your bank cards. Although many people now use their phones to pay, if you’ve lost your wallet or had it stolen it makes sense to cancel any debit or credit cards you had in there. Be sure to call your bank as soon as you’re sure you haven’t misplaced them.
  3. File a ‘denuncia’ – If you suspect your wallet was stolen, you should go to the nearest police station as soon as possible and file a report (denuncia in Spanish). It is also possible to do it by phone (the Spanish emergency number is 112) or online, but you will have to go to the police station to sign the denuncia at some point eventually, so it’s better to do it all in one go, and to do it as promptly as possible.

    It’s worth noting that very few Spanish police officers speak English, so, if possible, try to go with a Spanish speaker who can help you. Some police stations in larger cities may have a translator on site, but don’t count on it.

  4. Replace your ID cards – If you keep all your bank and ID cards together in your wallet, then losing it will mean that not only are you left without any money, but no identification to prove who you are.
    1. Passports – If you’re visiting Spain on holiday and lose your passport (or ID card, if you’re from an EU country) you should contact your embassy and arrange a short-term emergency passport in order to travel home.
    2. Driving license – if your driving license was in the wallet, you’ll need to go down to your local Jefatura Provincial de Tráfico and request a replacement. It is not usually necessary to make an appointment, but you will need to bring some kind of ID with you. Obviously this could be much more difficult if all your ID cards were lost or stolen in the wallet. If this is the case, bring any official documentation with your name, date of birth and crucially, photo, to help your case.

      You’ll also need to bring two passport photos and pay a fee of €20.

      All being well, you’ll be given a temporary license to allow you to drive until the replacement arrives.

    3. TIE/NIE – If you live in Spain, it’s likely you kept your TIE or old residency card (the small card-sized green document) in your wallet and have also lost that. As a foreigner living abroad, getting a replacement is important.

      To get a replacement, you’ll need to make an appointment (cita previa) at the extranjería. You can do this online by choosing the ‘card duplicate after theft or loss’ option on the dropdown menu. Some of the documents you’ll need are:

      – Form EX-17, (download here)
      – Proof of payment of the fee (790/012)
      – Original and copy of your passport.
      – Three passport photos.
      – Your denuncia.

FIND OUT MORE: What to do if you lose your TIE or other Spanish residency document

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