SHARE
COPY LINK

UN

Spain slammed over eviction of single mother and her six children

A UN committee has ordered Spain to compensate a single mother and her six children who were forcibly evicted during a housing crisis that saw tens of thousands forced from their homes.

Spain slammed over eviction of single mother and her six children
Archive photo of an anti-eviction protest in Barcelona. AFP

The UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights said on Wednesday that Madrid had violated the family's right to housing by failing to consider their vulnerability and should prevent similar cases from happening.

The mother, Maribel Viviana Lopez Alban, filed a complaint with the committee in June 2018 after attempting for several years to go through the Spanish courts to block her family's eviction.

She maintained that she had been renting an apartment in Madrid for a year when she discovered that the person she had been paying rent to was not the property's legal owner, committee documents showed.

In December 2014, the financial institution that really owned the property initiated eviction proceedings.

The family then applied for social housing, but their request was denied on grounds that people illegally occupying property were barred from the regional social housing programme.

READ MORE: 

Children suffered panic attacks

The UN committee, which has no enforcement powers, is made up of 18 independent experts tasked with monitoring whether countries adhere to their commitments under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

It had requested that Spain not evict the family while they were examining the case but the family was forcibly removed from their home by police in anti-riot gear shortly afterwards.

They bounced between temporary shelters and Lopez Alban told the committee her children had suffered panic attacks and learning difficulties.   

They were among tens of thousands of people who have been evicted from their homes in Spain since the housing bubble burst and the global financial crisis began in 2007.

The country's national statistics institute NIE tallied that there were 34,680 evictions in 2014 alone at the height of the crisis.

Last year, some 6,500 people were evicted from their homes, according to the latest available statistics.   

In its ruling, the UN committee found that the Spanish courts failed to weigh the rights of the property owner against the consequences of an eviction on the family.   

It also found that the rejection of the family's request for social housing violated the Covenant.

The UN experts called on Spain to “compensate the victims and to create a legal framework to prevent similar violations in the future.”   

They gave Madrid six months to provide an update on its implementation of the ruling.

READ ALSO: Nearly 100 families lose homes each day in Spain

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

HOUSING

Spain to give young mid-income earners €250 monthly rental allowance 

Spain’s Prime Minister announced on Tuesday his government will launch a housing scheme whereby 18 to 35 year olds who earn below €23,725 gross per year will be able to get a monthly discount of €250 off their rent.

Spain to give young mid-income earners €250 monthly rental allowance 
The average Spaniard leaves the nest at 29.5 years of age. Photo: Gabriel Bouys/AFP

Spanish PM Pedro Sánchez made the announcement during an Urban Affairs Forum in the southern city of Seville, referring to it as a “special plan” aimed at ensuring the emancipation of young people in the country.

“We’re going to create a youth housing benefit of €250 per month for the next two years which will benefit young people between 18 and 35 years old with incomes below €23,725,” Sánchez stated, meaning that these tenants will be able to claim a maximum of €6,000 in total.

The most vulnerable families will receive extra state aid to cover “up to 40 percent” of their monthly rent.

The income limit of €23,725 gross earnings a year amounts to wages of around €1,500 net a month. 

According to a September survey by Spanish property engine Fotocasa, 62 percent of under 35s in Spain face financial obstacles when buying or renting a property.

“We’re going to allocate a public policy specifically to reduce the age of emancipation which is so unbearably high in our country, so that young people can have access to decent rental housing,” Spain’s PM explained. 

The average Spaniard leaves the nest at 29.5 years of age, the sixth latest bloomers in Europe, where the average age of emancipation is 26.2 years old.

Sánchez’s announcement comes just as the Spanish left-wing coalition government of PSOE and Unidas Podemos have agreed on Spain’s Housing Budget for 2022, although the new legislation still has to be approved by the Spanish Cabinet. 

This is likely to include new measures aimed at placing price caps on rentals in Spain, based on a price index put together by Spain’s Ministry of Transport and Urban Affairs.

READ ALSO:

SHOW COMMENTS