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ANIMALS

Seville wants owners to rinse away dog pee

Municipal councils in Spain have long been battling to keep their streets free of dog messes introducing ingenious ways to punish or shame irresponsible pet owners, but Seville City Council has just taken it a step further.

Seville wants owners to rinse away dog pee
Photo: granevsergey/Depositphotos

The council has announced that it plans measures to force owners to carry bottles of disinfectant to rinse spots after their pets urinate, whether their animal has cocked its leg on a lamppost or doused a wall or pavement.

The Local Police will be given the authority to sanction pet owners who aren’t carrying disinfectant solution and fine those who fail to rinse away their dog’s wee.

The measure, which will be tested for one month before being formally introduced, comes after pressure from neighbourhood groups with residents complaining about the smell of dog urine.

READ ALSO: Why Spaniards are choosing pets over parenthood

Seville isn’t the first to introduce such a bylaw. In July, the city of Almeria brought the measure into force, insisting owners could rinse away their pets urine with a solution of water and vinegar.

Towns across Spain have introduced various measures to try and rid their streets of dog messes, including hiring private detectives,  testing DNA collected from excrement, and installing a giant inflatable poo to raise awareness.

In 2013, a viral campaign in Brunete, a small town just outside Madrid, saw officials box up waste and mail it back guilty pet owners.

Photo: Depositphotos

While in the town of Colmenar Viejo, also near Madrid, hired incognito detectives in 2014 to film owners who left their dog's poo lying around, and in 2016, Maslata, near Valencia, ordered residents to register their dog’s DNA through mandatory blood samples, so the owners who failed to clean up after their dogs could be traced.

In a battle to clean up the captial, Madrid's mayor introduced a 2016 law, giving dog poo offenders the choice between a €750 fine or a weekend of cleaning duty.

READ ALSO: Who stole this huge inflatable turd from a Spanish square?

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PETS

Spain’s new pet ID in 2022: What you need to know 

As of 2022, Spanish cats and dogs will likely need an official national ID - dubbed "el DNI Animal" - as part of a series of new pet laws aimed at bolstering animal rights in the country.

Although it is yet to be confirmed whether this document will contain a photo of the animal, it will include other details such as name, date of birth and ownership history. Photo: Jonathan Daniels/Unsplash
Although it is yet to be confirmed whether this document will contain a photo of the animal, it will include other details such as name, date of birth and ownership history. Photo: Jonathan Daniels/Unsplash

Why does Spain want to introduce a national pet ID?

Spain’s General Directorate of Animal Rights aims to build a national database of pets in Spain. 

According to Spain’s Minister of Social Rights and Agenda 2030 Ione Belarra, the identification of domestic animals will serve “to guarantee that we are on the right path and have a model where no animal is left to its own devices in Spain”.

The pet ID will contain basic information relating to the animal, such as its date of birth, the number of vaccines it has had or any mistreatment carried out by its owners.

Although not officially confirmed, the new ID document will likely include a photo of the pet. 

The pet ID will reportedly make it easier to locate the owner of the animal in cases of abandonment.

In addition, the document will be compatible with the microchip that cats and dogs must have implanted at the vet when pet owners buy or adopt them.

What other documents do pet owners already need to have in Spain?

In order to legally own a pet in Spain, you need to have a health booklet (cartilla sanitaria) which includes its medical and vaccination records which has to be issued by a chartered veterinarian. This document also contains information about the pet and its owner. 

The microchip implanted under animals’ skin is also compulsory for cats and dogs in Spain, and it is currently considered the main means of identification for pets in the country.

Proof that your animal has had the rabies vaccine is also essential.

For travel purposes, your pet will need to have a pet passport, compulsory for travel within the EU since 2015. 

Veterinarian clinics are responsible for ordering these documents which contain much the same information as the upcoming DNI Animal – name, species, gender, breed, date of birth, microchip number, health record – but pet passports are only a requirement if you’re going to travel with them.

How else is Spain trying to protect its pets?

The DNI Animal is part of the draft bill for the Protection and Rights of Animals that Pedro Sánchez’s administration presented on October 6th, which also includes other measures that bolster animal rights in Spain.

One would hope that when it comes to protecting the country’s animals, there would be no major differences of opinion between Spain’s political factions. 

The draft bill is set to be discussed by Spain’s Council of Ministers in November before being debated in the Spanish Parliament, so it could be that the introduction of this animal ID will be pushed back until late 2022. 

Other measures in the draft bill include the requirement for people to do a training course before being allowed to adopt a pet, which teaches budding pet owners how to handle and care for their furry ones. 

Only fish will be sold in pet stores if the new law passes, no more puppies and kittens in the window as this is deemed to incite “compulsive buying”. Instead, dogs and cats will have to be purchased from professional breeders or adopted at rescue shelters.

There will also be a limit of five pets per household, although this won’t be applied retroactively.

The Spanish government will also consider pets to be “living beings with feelings” and not objects in custody battles.

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