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CRIME

How to avoid being pickpocketed in Spain: tricks and scams to watch out for

Pickpocketing has fallen in Spain as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, but it still happens in big cities and other popular tourist spots. Here is a rundown of some of the scams thieves use that you should watch out for.

How to avoid being pickpocketed in Spain: tricks and scams to watch out for
Citizens on patrol argue with a presumed pickpocket (R) at a metro station in Barcelona on August 14, 2019. - A surge in muggings and burglaries in Barcelona, mainly targeting tourists, sparked alarm in Spain's second-largest city, leading local residents to form their own crime fighting patrols. (Photo by LLUIS GENE / AFP)

Spain is undoubtedly a safe country overall, but a crime that authorities haven’t managed to stamp out is pickpocketing.

That’s largely because thieves are aware that Spanish law allows them to steal goods worth less than €400 and not face a prison sentence if caught, so they exploit the system.

That has resulted in the growth of pickpocketing gangs in big cities such as Madrid and Barcelona, where you have to keep your wits about you.

Fortunately, the pandemic’s restrictions and lockdowns, as well as the lack of tourists, have seen pickpocketing and other robberies fall dramatically since 2020.

In 2019, Barcelona was in the midst of a crime wave with 83,472 robberies recorded in the first half of the year. 

According to the latest Eurostat report, street theft in Spain in 2021 fell by 34 percent compared to 2019 and robberies with violence dropped by 22 percent. 

Despite this drop, pickpocketing does still happen, so you need to watch out and know what scams to be aware of. 

Whether you’re a tourist or a local, it’s worth knowing these tips to keep your belongings safe. 

Keep your belongings close on public transport

Pickpockets are known to enter the metro and scan the carriage for unattended bags to steal. Here, timing is key: the pickpocket snatches your belongings and runs away with them just as the metro’s doors are about to close. This effectively ensures that you can’t go after them. If you choose to put your bag on the floor or on the seat next to you, make sure you’re holding on to it, especially if you’re sitting close to the doors.

Be wary of thieves in tourist spots

It’s possible to be robbed in any of Madrid’s neighbourhoods, but pickpockets are known to frequent those areas crammed with tourists – Gran Vía, Sol, Paseo del Prado, and the area near the Palacio Real, just to name a few. In fact, there are higher incidences of pickpocketing reported on metro lines most frequently used by tourists, such as those to and from the airport.

In Barcelona, pickpockets are known to hang out on Las Ramblas, in El Born near the Picasso Museum, in Raval, in the Gothic Quarter and around the Sagrada Familia, but even if you’re not in these areas, you still need to watch out. Common metro stations for pickpockets are Plaça Espanya, Plaça Catalunya, and Sagrada Familia. 

READ MORE: Keep passports safe: Typical pickpocket scams revealed

gran via in madrid

Gran Vía, Madrid. Photo: Pedro Belleza/Flickr.

Watch out for fake undercover cops

Another less common scam sees pickpockets masquerading as undercover policemen. They approach you on the street and ask for your wallet and documentation, pretending that they’re looking for counterfeit notes or drugs. You’ll discover later that they stealthily swiped a few notes while they were looking through your money.

Remember that the police are unlikely to approach you unless your behaviour seems suspicious or you are inebriated; moreover, they certainly wouldn’t ask to go through your wallet. While the police could ask for your documentation, they wouldn’t do it before showing you a police badge. 

police in spain
Police in Spain. Photo: [email protected]/Flickr.

Beware of other ‘tourists’

If a hapless, confused-looking person armed with a map and camera asks you for directions, you’re likely to try your best to help. While you’re pointing them the right way, be aware that the ‘tourist’ might have an accomplice using the distraction to pickpocket you.

Photo: Galio/ Flickr

Don’t be the jamón in the sandwich

This could happen in any place that’s reasonably crowded. You find yourself sandwiched between two people on the street, an escalator, a bus, or particularly between the metro gates, while the person behind you picks your pocket or backpack. In crowded areas, wear your backpack in front of you and avoid keeping valuables in your pockets.

iberian ham sandwich
An Iberan ham sandwich. Photo: urban_lenny/Flickr.

Look out for the ‘Rosemary women’

This scam is more common in Spain’s southern Andalusian cities such as Seville and Granada, than in Madrid or Barcelona. It will typically happen outside churches or other touristic places of interest such as Seville’s Plaza de España or the Cathedral. Typically it will be women trying to give you sprigs of rosemary for ‘good luck’. Be aware, that this is not a gift and if you accept it they will demand money from you. If you take out your wallet in a bid to give them something, they may even help themselves to a few notes. The best thing to do is walk on by and not take the rosemary, even if they try and put it in your hand. 

Be careful while paying the bill

It’s well known that leaving your phone or wallet out on restaurant tables provides pickpockets with an easy target. However, you might find yourself scammed even while paying the bill. The waiter will take your cash, swap it with fake notes, and return to accuse you of paying with counterfeit money. This effectively forces you to pay again. If this happens, make sure you speak to the restaurant’s management before paying double.

Don’t fall for the fake petition trick

Pickpockets will often approach people on the streets with a fake petition to sign. Whether you sign or not, they will ask you to donate to ‘charity’ as a way of extorting money. This scam is easy to see through, but there’s more to it: the pickpocket has an accomplice who uses the distraction to steal your belongings while the other openly extorts money from you. It’s best to avoid strangers approaching you on the streets and asking for donations; don’t be fooled into thinking the money goes to a good cause.

Watch out for the bird poo scam

The thief will unknowingly squirt some white liquid on your back and then inform you that a bird has done its business on you. They will then offer to help clean it up, while stealing your wallet from your pocket or bag at the same time. Be aware of any stranger coming up to you, telling you that you have bird poo on your clothes and simply walk away before they can ‘help’ you. 

Don’t fall for the drop scam either

Pickpockets often feign goodwill, coming after you and pretending to return a valuable item you’ve dropped. While you deny the item is yours, an accomplice uses the distraction to snatch your wallet. If you turn around and find a stranger with a wad of cash or some jewellery that’s not yours, walk away as fast as possible. The ‘drop’ scam works the other way round, too – you might see a person suddenly drop money or a bag on the ground, so you’d stop to help them while an accomplice steals your things.

Avoid impromptu roadside games


Never join in an impromptu card game. Photo: Jeffrey Smith/Flickr 

You might stroll down the street to find a few people playing a card game on the footpath. No matter how enticing it is, refuse their invitation to join the game – they will cheat to make sure you lose your money. The football scam is popular as well: a group of strangers might ask you to join their football match. Once you’ve enjoyed a quick game, chances are you won’t find your belongings where you left them.

READ ALSO:  Police warn tourists against common scam in Mallorca

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TRAVEL NEWS

EXPLAINED: Spain’s new rules for unvaccinated non-EU tourists

Unvaccinated third-country nationals such as Americans and Britons are now allowed to go on holiday to Spain. Here are the requirements, documentation needed and other important information they should know before booking their flights to Spain. 

EXPLAINED: Spain's new rules for unvaccinated non-EU tourists

What’s the latest?

Spain has opened up to unvaccinated non-EU/Schengen tourists for the first time in more than two years.

Previously it was not possible for third-country nationals to visit Spain for non-essential reasons such as a holiday, seeing family or spending time in a second home in Spain unless they were fully vaccinated against Covid-19 (plus booster after 9 months) or recovered from the illness in the past six months. 

From May 21st 2022, unvaccinated tourists and other visitors from outside of the EU can travel to Spain if they show proof of a negative Covid-19 test, the Spanish government confirmed on Saturday. These are the same rules that apply to EU nationals and residents.

Spain’s testing requirements for non-EU/Schengen tourists apply to those aged 12 and older, children under that age are exempt from having to prove testing, vaccination or recovery.

What kind of Covid test do I need to get done to travel to Spain?

In scientific terms, Spain wants a diagnostic test that’s either a NAAT (nucleic acid amplification test, such as an RT-PCR, RT-LAMP, TMA) or a RAT (rapid antigen test).

In layman’s terms, that’s either a PCR test, which must be carried out in the 72 hours prior to departure to Spain, or an antigen test, 24 hours prior to departure.

Covid tests accepted are those authorised by the European Commission and must have been performed by healthcare professionals, therefore self-tests are not valid. 

What do I need to show to travel to Spain if I’m unvaccinated?

You need to show an official certificate or supporting document which shows the negative result of your Covid test. Your country may have a system in place that allows you to upload your negative result to an app. 

The document must be the original, in Spanish, English, French or German, and may be shown in paper or electronic format. If you can’t get it in these languages, it must be accompanied by a translation into Spanish by an official body.

The document that accredits the diagnostic test has to include the date the sample was taken, identification and contact details of the centre performing the analysis, technique used and negative result.

Spanish authorities recognise the UK’s NHS Covid Pass and others that fulfil the above criteria. 

Do I need to fill out a health control form?

This depends. Currently, 40 non-EU countries (and territories) have joined the EU Digital COVID Certificate system, based on EU equivalence decisions. 

That means that people from these nations who have a vaccination, testing or recovery certificate issued by the competent authorities of their country do not need to fill in Spain’s Travel Health form.

The countries with EU Digital Covid Certificate equivalence are Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Benin, Cabo Verde, Colombia, El Salvador, Faroe Islands, Georgia, Indonesia, Israel, Iceland, Jordan, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Norway, Panama, San Marino, Serbia, Seychelles, Singapore, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Tunisia, Togo, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and the Crown Dependencies (Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man), Uruguay, The Vatican and Vietnam.You can also double-check here in case more countries are added.

If your non-EU country isn’t on the list then you have to fill in the SPTH form and upload your test certificate, which gives you a QR Code you’ll be asked for at the airport. 

READ MORE: A step-by-step guide on how to fill out Spain’s Health Control Form

Do I have to wear a mask on the plane?

Yes, you will most likely be required to wear a mask on the planes to and from Spain, although you don’t have to wear one inside Spanish airports anymore.

READ MORE: What are Spain’s mask rules for travel?

Is there any other travel rule I need to know about?

If you’re not an EU citizen or resident, then you should check if you require a Schengen visa to travel to Spain, as this will depend on your nationality.

Keep in mind that you will also have to abide by other Schengen rules, such as not being able to spend more than 90 out of 180 days in Spain and other Schengen countries.

Does Spain still have domestic Covid-19 rules?

Spain has lifted the vast majority of its Covid-19 rules, so there are no longer curfews, forced closures, limits on the number of people per shop or restaurant or Covid pass requirements to gain entry to buildings. 

Masks are no longer required outdoors and there is no face covering mandate for the majority of indoor public settings, except for on public transport, in hospitals, pharmacies, other health clinics and care homes.

READ MORE: What happens when tourists get Covid-19 while on holiday in Spain?

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