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CRIME

Meat grinder was used to dispose of victim

Police have confirmed that remains found in a meatgrinder were that of an Argentinian lodger of the Majadahonda man detained last week.

Meat grinder was used to dispose of victim
A photo of a Guardia Civil van Photo: Cesar Manso / AFP

Bruno Fernandez, 32 an unemployed man from Majadahonda suburb of Madrid was arrested last week over the disappearance of his 55-year-old lodger Adriana Giogiosa.

A search of his house led to the discovery of what was thought to be human remains, including what appeared to be a tooth, on a meatgrinder at the property.

"We can confirm that traces found in the bathtub and in the meatgrinder belonged to that of the Argentinian woman, after DNA testing proved positive," a Civil Guard spokesman told The Local.

Investigators will begin to search a second property on Thursday linked to the suspect who is already in custody.

"A country house In Toledo that belongs to the aunt of the man in custody will be searched today," the Civil Guard spokesman told The Local.

"We still have no trace of where that aunt might be," she added.

The chalet in Majadahonda and the finca in Toledo belong to an aunt of Fernandez who herself has not been seen for years. Fernández claimed that he had "inherited" the property after she was moved to a residential care home. But authorities have no record of her being taken into care.

Investigators had initially been concerned that three other women connected to the alleged killer may also have disappeared.

But they have now discounted them as victims.

"We have managed to locate the three women we were initially concerned about," said the Guardia Civil spokesman.

Neighbours from a former residence of Fernández have described how he regularly sacrificed live animals in apparent satanic rituals, forcing regular complaints to police, according to a report in Tuesday’s El Mundo.

 

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BARCELONA ATTACKS

Spain marks five years since Catalonia jihadist attacks

A ceremony was held in Barcelona on Wednesday in memory of 16 people killed in jihadist attacks in the Catalan city and a nearby resort exactly five years ago.

Spain marks five years since Catalonia jihadist attacks

Dozens of people observed a minute’s silence on the tree-lined Las Ramblas boulevard where on August 17, 2017 a van mowed down pedestrians, leaving a trail of death.

As a cellist played a traditional Catalan song, relatives of the victims and officials laid white carnations in front of a memorial plaque marking the spot where the van came to a halt.

Among those attending were Transport Minister Raquel Sánchez, Culture minister Miquel Iceta, the president of the regional government of Catalonia Pere Aragonès, and Barcelona mayor Ada Colau.

“This date used to be just another day in the calendar. Now on August 17 you always wake up with a knot in your stomach,” Colau told public television TVE just before the ceremony.

The attacks, which also left 140 people injured, were carried out by a cell made up mostly of young people of Moroccan descent who grew up in Catalonia. They were claimed by the Islamic State group.

The first attack took place on the famous Ramblas avenue in Barcelona, where a truck rammed into passers-by, killing 14 people, mostly foreign tourists. The youngest victim was a three-year-old boy.

Relatives of victims hold white carnation flowers to place at Las Ramblas Boulevard in Barcelona, on August 17, 2022, as the city marks the fifth anniversary of the 2017 jihadist attacks in Barcelona and Cambrils that left 16 people dead. – A van rammed into crowds on Las Ramblas Boulevard in the heart of Barcelona on August 17, 2017, igniting four days of terror. (Photo by Josep LAGO / AFP)

The driver, who had killed a 30-year-old man to steal his car while fleeing, was shot dead a few days later by the police.

Several hours after the first attack, five accomplices drove into more pedestrians and stabbed a woman who later died of her injuries in Cambrils, a seaside resort 100 kilometres (60 miles) to the south. All five suspects were shot dead by police.

In a tweet, Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez said Barcelona and Cambrils had “suffered hate and terror in their streets”.

“Five years later, we remember the victims of these attacks with our sights set on continuing to build a future of peace,” he said.

A Spanish court in 2021 found three men guilty of assisting the perpetrators of the attacks and sentenced them to eight, 46 and 53 years in jail.

But last month, a court reduced by 10 years the sentences of the two men who had received the longest jail terms. The third convict was granted parole in September 2021.

A handful of protesters who accuse the Spanish government of being behind the attacks jeered and chanted during the moment of silence and held up signs that read: “We demand the truth”.

The protest was called by several small Catalan separatist groups and some of the signs held up by the participants had Catalan separatist flags.

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