SHARE
COPY LINK

LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

Vinnie Jones teaches Spanish in hilarious ad

A new advert has just been released starring footballer-turned-actor Vinnie Jones, in which he shows off his, dubious, Spanish skills to help people learn common holiday phrases.

Vinnie Jones teaches Spanish in hilarious ad
Photo: Screengrab Youtube/ThreeUK

In a new advert for mobile phone company, Three, Jones, more known for playing gangsters than teaching languages, does his enthusiastic best to teach some essential Spanish phrases.

"We all love a bit of Costa Blanca!" says Jones at the beginning of the ad, before launching into a quick Spanish lesson.

With an accent veering from mainland Spanish, to Latin American by way of Watford, Jones then teaches "Hola, me llamo Vinne. Y tu?" ("Hi, my name’s Vinnie, what’s yours?").

From asking the way to the beach to chatting up girls in clubs, Vinnie has all the holiday lingo covered in the two-minute advert.

"Oye, me das otra cerveza, por favor," Vinnie capably translates as "Excuse me pal, can I have another beer please?".

"Oi! Come over here and get in this selfie mate!" ("¡Eh,¡Eh, tío! Ven aquí para que salgas en este selfie!") is another one of Vinnie’s Spanish gems. 

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.
For members

SPANISH HABITS

¡Salud! The different ways to say cheers in Spanish

You may be familiar with the basic way Spaniards say ‘cheers’, but there are other Spanish expressions and habits associated with clinking glasses and making a toast that you’ll be happy to learn.

¡Salud! The different ways to say cheers in Spanish

Life in Spain comes with plenty of get-togethers and celebrations, and although alcoholic excesses are not generally part of the Spanish culture, booze will be a part of almost all social occurrences.

If you’re a foreigner who’s made Spain their new home, it’s therefore important to familiarise yourself with the language and idiosyncrasies that are part of such occasions.

Let’s start with the word for a toast, in the sense of honouring someone or something with a drink.

The noun for this is un brindis, which apparently originally comes from the German ‘bring dirs’, meaning ‘bring thee’ (as in, I’ll ‘bring thee’ a drink, a speech, etc.). There’s also the verb brindar, which means to toast.

So if you want to give a toast in Spanish, you should start off by saying me gustaría proponer un brindis por… or me gustaría brindar por… (I’d like to make a toast for) and once you’ve finished your speech you should raise your glass and for example say ¡Por los novios! (for the newlyweds) or ¡Por Juan! (for Juan!).

When it comes to clinking the glasses, Spaniards will often use the interjection chinchín, an onomatopoeia which pays heed to the sound, but it’s really the same as saying cheers.

The most common word used in Spanish to say cheers is ¡Salud!, which means ‘health’, in the same way as the French say santé and the Germans gesondheid. Spaniards may also direct their toast specifically at the person they’re drinking with by saying ¡A tu salud! (To your health!). 

You may be happy to learn that Spaniards don’t take the custom of looking into the other person’s eyes while clinking glasses or drinking quite so seriously as in other European countries, where the failure to do so carries the penalty of seven years of bad sex (ouch!).

A quick glance at the person you’re cheering with will go down well, however, as direct eye contact is the standard in social situations in Spain.

READ ALSO: Why does the birthday person pay for everyone’s food and drinks in Spain?

What is considered to bring bad luck in the bedroom is toasting with a non-alcoholic drink in Spain, so consider yourself warned.

Catalans have an interesting version of the Spanish cheers – ¡salut i força al canut! – which translates to ‘Cheers and strength to the purse’ in order to wish health and wealth, although some people wrongly assume it’s meant to wish people good virility.

While we’re on the subject, there is a very common cheering expression used in Spanish to do with rumpy pumpy.

After cheering, whether by raising a glass or clicking glasses, many Spaniards will then take their glass and quickly place it down on the table before lifting it again to take a swig.

Bemused foreigners will then be reminded that el que no apoya, no folla, ‘the one who doesn’t place it (the glass) down, doesn’t have sex’.

Does it make it any sense? Nope, but it does get a few laughs, and before long you’ll find yourself quickly tapping the base of your drink against the table through force of habit.

Another interesting habit that foreigners in Spain tend to find amusing is when a group of friends in a circle move their glasses in four different directions whilst saying ¡Arriba, abajo, al centro y para dentro!, which means ‘up, down, to the centre and inside’, the latter being when you drink.

So there you have it, ¡Salud a todos! (Cheers to everyone!)

READ ALSO: 

SHOW COMMENTS