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Spain's new royals spend big on airplane food

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Spain's new royals spend big on airplane food
Segovian suckling pig (Spain's finest) is on the royal plane menu. Photo: Fadel Senna/AFP, Puroticorico/Flickr
12:27 CEST+02:00
Spain's government is set to double the plane food budget for the country's ministers and monarchs, with everything from suckling pig to Iberian ham and melon on the menu.

The Spanish government’s daily Congressional Record (BOE) reported the news on Friday, highlighting that the annual budget will go from €65,000 to €133,000.

Based on previous spending, the sum is likely to be even higher than that. It usually is.

In 2012, Spain’s Defence Department used €342,693 of taxpayers’ money to pay the yearly bill, much more than was initially stipulated.

Spanish online daily 20 minutos even went as far as estimating the plane food bill for 2014 could be as high as €413,900.

So what’s on this pricy menu?

Segovian suckling pig (Spain’s finest), sirloin steak and potatoes au gratin, Bilbao-style seabass (lubina a la bilbaína), braised lamb medallion, sheep cheese, Iberian ham and melon, peeled fruit, pastries and many more dishes and desserts.

IF YOU THOUGHT THOSE SPANISH MENU TRANSLATIONS WERE BAD, CHECK OUT THESE SHOCKERS

Some price limits for food products have been set; whether Spain’s Defence Ministry sticks to these constraints depends largely on whether they make the final invoice public (2013’s hasn’t been released yet).

Although Spain’s new king and queen are understandably likely to travel abroad to make the acquaintance of other world leaders, their exorbitant plane food budget goes against their attempts at portraying a new low-key image of the royal family. 

READ ALSO: Queen's selfie shows new side of Spanish royals 

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