SHARE
COPY LINK

PAINTING

Identified: Two ‘new’ Dali paintings in US

Two oil paintings including one owned by Yale University in the United States have been certified as being the work of Spanish surrealist artist Salvador Dali, officials said on Tuesday.

Identified: Two 'new' Dali paintings in US
File photo: STP/AFP

Art experts from the Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation knew that the two works existed but up until now they had been unable to locate and authenticate them.

"We had identified the works but we did not know where they were or how to link them to Dali. We thought they were made by him but we had to verify," the director of the foundation's research department, Montse Aguer, told news agency AFP.

"These are works from Dali's surrealist period. Both are very significant. They depict dreamlike landscapes that are typical of Dali, with shadows and big pedestals."

Don't miss stories about Spain, join The Local on Facebook and Twitter.

The two paintings were painted in 1930 and they were put on display by Dali only once, in separate exhibitions.

The Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation, located in the mustachioed artist's native Figueres in northeastern Spain, discovered the existence of the works through press clippings about the exhibitions that were published at the time.

One painting, "Free Inclination of Desire", which depicts a large rock along with ants, keys and other random objects, was shown in an exhibition in 1935 in Santa Cruz de Tenerife, the capital of Spain's Canary Islands.

It belongs to the art gallery of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.   

The other painting, "Simulation of the Night", which depicts a veined hand on a column in a barren landscape, appeared at an exhibition in San Francisco in 1965.

It is in the hands of a private collector who does not wish to be identified.

Dali, who is praised by some as a creative genius for his striking and bizarre images, died in Figueres in 1989 aged 85.

The news comes only days after the Spanish tax office said it may have found a Van Gogh in a safety deposit box during an investigation into tax fraud. The painting is yet to be authenticated.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

POLICE

Pensioner claims €15m Picasso was a gift

UPDATED: Italian police are trying to establish the true owner of a Picasso painting worth €15 million after confiscating it from a pensioner who says he was given it for free.

Pensioner claims €15m Picasso was a gift
Celebrated Spanish artist, Pablo Picasso. Photo: Ralph Gatti/AFP

The Rome resident, a former frame-maker, told detectives he received the work in 1978 as a thank you gift for an act of kindness towards a recently bereaved customer.

A widower had come into his shop in a state of distress after breaking a photo frame in which he kept a picture of his lamented late wife. Touched, the frame-maker replaced the glass for free.

Two days later, the elderly customer returned to the workshop and presented him with the Picasso, without giving any indication of its value or artistic significance.

According to the frame-maker's story, it was only last year that he realized the 54 x 45cm oil on canvas could be a Picasso, police said.

The painting is a representation of a violin and a bottle of Bass beer which police experts have authenticated as a 1912 work by the Spanish artist, then at the height of his Cubist phase.

The police became interested in it last year when auction house Sotheby's, who had been instructed by the pensioner, attempted to secure a state authorizaton to export it with a declared estimated value of €1.4 million.

That triggered an investigation during which police were able to identify the work as corresponding to one mentioned in a 1961 edition of the Zervos, a catalogue of Picasso's work which is considered the definitive guide to the Spanish artist's prodigious output.

Bottles of Bass pale ale, which carried a distinctive red triangle on their classic labels, feature in over 40 Picasso paintings, mostly from his Cubist period.

The iconic British beer, once the most widely drunk in the world, also puts in an appearance in impressionist Edouard Manet's 1882 painting A Bar at the Folies-Bergere.

Precious Roman marble 

The specialist police unit which deals with crimes related to art works and cultural artefacts unveiled two other significant seizures on Friday, including a Roman sculpture dating from the second or third century which has an estimated value of €8 million.

The marble was dug up during unauthorized excavations in Tarquinia, a town just to the north of Rome famed for its roots in the post-Roman Etruscan period.

Police seized it as part of an investigation into the gang behind the illegal digs who, they believe, were planning to drive the marble to Switzerland in order to find a buyer.

The sculpture features the Roman God Mithra killing a bull and was said to be almost perfectly preserved. There are thought to be only two other marbles of similar composition and quality in the world – one is in the British Museum and the other is houses in one of Vatican museums.

The third work recently recovered was another very valuable oil painting, a view of St Mark's square in Venice by noted Italian landscape painter Luca Carlevarius (1655-1731).

The work, which had been registered as stolen, was found following raids on the premises of a Milan art broker suspected of smuggling artworks to Switzerland with a view to selling them on to wealthy collectors in the United States.

SHOW COMMENTS