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CHINA

‘Spain has swapped human rights for money’

A Tibetan monk who pushed a human rights case against former Chinese leaders through Spanish courts accused China on Tuesday of pressuring Madrid to change the law that made the complaint possible.

'Spain has swapped human rights for money'
Thubten said Spain's ruling conservative Popular Party "was listening and supporting the Chinese government and this is why it is reforming the law". Photo: Pierre Phillipe Marcou/AFP

Thubten Wangchen, a member of the exiled Tibetan parliament, said Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's government had moved to limit the use of "universal jurisdiction", which allows judges to try certain cases of human rights abuses committed in other countries, only to appease China.

A Spanish judge on Monday sought international arrest warrants for former Chinese president Jiang Zemin and four other top Chinese officials as part of a probe opened into alleged genocide in Tibet under this doctrine.

Thubten, a Spanish citizen who was born in Tibet in 1954 but exiled with his family when he was a child, brought the case in a Spanish court in 2006 along with two Tibetan support groups.

China, a significant economic partner of Spain, reacted angrily to the judge's move, saying it was "strongly dissatisfied".

Thubten said Spain's ruling conservative Popular Party "was listening and supporting the Chinese government and this is why it is reforming the law."

"There is no other reason. The Chinese government is putting a great deal of pressure on Rajoy's government and therefore poor Rajoy has to take note and obey China, there is no other choice," Thubten told AFP.

Under a bill introduced last month by the Popular Party, judges will be able to investigate crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide only if the suspect is a Spanish national, a foreigner living in Spain or a foreigner in Spain whose extradition has been denied.

Spanish lawmakers will vote late on Tuesday whether to put the draft bill to a debate and vote.

The Popular Party has a comfortable majority in the assembly and the bill is assured to pass.

"If Spanish government changes the law at the request of China then that means it is China which is in charge in Spain. If the law changes it would be shameful for the Chinese government," Thubten said after visiting the Spanish parliament during its preliminary debate on the draft law.

"The former president of China did criminal deeds and is responsible for genocide in Tibet and now he is facing the bill and he has to pay that bill. It is normal," he added.

China considers Tibet an integral part of its territory, which it has ruled since 1951, a year after invading the Himalayan region.

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FOOTBALL

Wu Lei’s move to Spain’s ‘Liga’ is ‘massive’, says ‘China’s Beckham’

Wu Lei's transfer to La Liga is "massive" for Chinese football, says a former international who made a similar journey 19 years ago and helped convince the forward to take the plunge in Europe.

Wu Lei's move to Spain's 'Liga' is 'massive', says 'China's Beckham'
Espanyol's unveiled its new Chinese forward Wu Lei on January 29, 2019. Photo: AFP

Xie Hui knows what it is like to venture out of the relative obscurity of Chinese football and make a success of it, having scored goals in Germany's second division.

Now 44 and retired from playing, Xie also knows Wu better than most after working with him for the last few years at Chinese Super League champions Shanghai SIPG.


Xie Hui looking on during an AFC Champions League group stage football match last week. 

Wu left SIPG, where Xie is an assistant coach, for Espanyol in January for a reported €2 million ($2.25 million) and made history this month when he became the first Chinese to score in Spain's top league.

Few Chinese have played among Europe's elite, but Xie told AFP that 27-year-old Wu can make as much of an impact — if not more — as Sun Jihai, who was at Premier League Manchester City from 2002-2008.

“I have no doubt that he has the capability to play in a top league, in a decent team,” Xie said of last season's CSL top-scorer.   

“He always had this dream so he would talk to me and say, 'Oh, but what about the language?' But football is a common language.   

“I told him not to worry, the most important is on the pitch and the training ground. They will respect you if you show it on the pitch, it's as simple as that.”

Xie, who once earned comparisons to David Beckham, because he was married to an actress/model, sent Wu a message of congratulations after his landmark goal in Chinese-owned Espanyol's 3-1 win over Real Valladolid.   

Wu's progress is being closely monitored in China and millions back home will watch the broadcast of Espanyol's city derby with Lionel Messi's Barcelona on March 30.

“It's massive, massive, and something we missed for almost the last 15 years,” Xie said of what Wu's move meant for the development of Chinese football.

Need for speed

Like Wu, Xie was a forward, and after starting his career at Shanghai Shenhua, he moved to Alemannia Aachen in Germany's second tier in 2000.   

Xie hit 20 goals in 52 games and attracted the attention of teams in Germany's top flight, before returning to Shenhua in 2002.   

He had two further stints in Germany, before retiring in 2008.   

Xie, who scored nine goals in 22 appearances for China, warned that Wu will need to be patient and “speed up his mindset” in Spain.   

“Pace and physically, he has no problem,” Xie said.   

“But the CSL is much slower, he had much more time, two seconds in front of the goal. But maybe in Spain, you have just one second.”   

Xie, who has worked under the “unique personalities” of Sven-Goran Eriksson, Andre Villas-Boas and now Vitor Pereira at SIPG, is confident Wu will succeed in La Liga.

But he is less optimistic about the immediate future of Chinese football.   

“I do not see that many (like Wu Lei), I would say another one or two, and that's it of that generation,” he warned.   

That dearth of quality hurts the national side, who have qualified for the World Cup only once, in 2002.

So what hopes of reaching Qatar 2022?   

“That will be a miracle, I would not bet over 50 percent,” said Xie.

“From my understanding it will come, but later, at least 10 years from now.

By AFP's Peter Stebbings 

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